Choosing what to teach

Being able to transfer knowledge to another person is a gift, and in this case you’ll get paid for it!

The best workshops come from a mix of passion and confidence, but if you had to pick one, pick confidence (and work towards passion in a future workshop).

Find the crossover between Passion and Confidence

Something you’re passionate about

  • What are the things that you do that light you up?
  • What would you do even if no one got to see the end result?
  • What do you get insatiably curious about?

You can instantly tell when someone is passionate about something they’re talking about. Though we express it in different ways, something lights up inside them.

That lighting up is something we want you to have, but it’s also something that makes for a great experience for your patrons.

Something you feel good at

  • What are you comfortable with?
  • What do you know like the back of your hand?
  • What do people come to you for help with?

If you’re stuck, ask your friends and family what you’re best at.

Still stuck? Grab a pen and paper

The idea here is writing as much as you can - you’re the only one who has to see it!

Choosing what to teach This can end up forming your service/workshop and be the starting point for writing your description.

Set a 5 minute timer for each of the following questions (but keep going past the timer if the muse is with you):

  • What do you get complimented for?
  • How have you made your life or work much easier for yourself?
  • Have you ever worked on something you were excited to tell others about?
  • Is there something you wish you knew when you started out?
  • What is the biggest learning hump for what you do? Could you break that down into smaller steps for other people?
  • What is the simplest thing that you know well that most people miss? Could you teach it on its own?
  • What you think is needed in the world?

Pick something

If you have heaps of ideas, pick one. You can always add another later and done is better than perfect.

When you’re choosing, don’t worry about minor details like “how” (you'll get around to that) but do spend time thinking about what skill you want people to have at the end of the workshop.